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Mapping Crime in the Czech Republic

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Mapping Crime in the Czech Republic

In Czech Republic there has been a long lasting discussion about accessibility of crime data to general public. Despite it the Czech police didn't move forward and publishes only very complexe and user-unfriendly Excel tables. While Otevrena spolecnost sees access to data as a crucial condition for debate between the public and the police about efficiency of crime control and focus of crime prevention, we decided to enhance this debate by its online visualisation.

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Skopje Raste (Skopje is Growing)

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Skopje Raste (Skopje is Growing)

Skopje Raste is an interactive map that traces the growth of the urban landscape in the central area of the city of Skopje and it was created by Reactor – Research in Action in partnership with a local architecture firm, Arhitektri. It visualizes four sets of urban elements (buildings, greenery, parking spaces and illegal buildings) over three chronological stages, providing users with a simple visualization of how changes to the detailed urban plans (DUPs) are affecting their neighborhoods.

The goal of our map is to provide a user-friendly visualization of the effects of past and future unregulated urban growth, but perhaps more importantly, to provide an alternative to presenting the overly technical DUPs in a way that every citizen can understand. Our ultimate goal is to convince municipal governments to adopt this, or at least a similar approach in their work, in order to allow for a more meaningful participation of citizens in the urban development process.

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Who is whose family in Slovak courts

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Who is whose family in Slovak courts

Both public and experts feel deep distrust toward the Slovak judiciary. According to the Transparency International's Global corruption Barometer poll from 2012, as many as 69% of respondents find Slovak judiciary corrupt. Moreover, 8% of households claim to have been asked for a bribe in courts in the past 12 months.

The judiciary is a relatively closed community. Very few people discuss the quality of judges or their rulings. Media often criticize judiciary as a whole, saying “the courts today decided” instead of “the judges X and Y ruled that…” Only five courts (out of 63) have even their own web pages. In effect, judges are far less accountable to public than politicians or government employees.

In summer 2013 we launched the Open Courts website (Otvorenesudy.sk), pooling together any public data on judges, including their verdicts, workload and the speed of decisions. In our first visualization drawn from our new portal's data, we show how much family connections matter in Slovak judiciary.

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#MéxicoEn140

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#MéxicoEn140

#MexicoEn140 is a tool that intends to explore new alternatives to analyze and present public information in a creative, dynamic and engaging way. By continuously scanning over 650 twitter accounts of decision makers, opinion leaders, politicians, and public institutions in Mexico, our tool generates a visual representation of the trending and most popular topics being discussed in the governmental and academic spheres. Our users have the possibility of exploring different categories to find out what the group of his or her interest is talking about (senators, executive branch, opinion leaders, etc.), and to understand at a glimpse what is taking place in the public debate amongst leaders and authorities in the country.

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The visa business - The cost of visas for Kosovars

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The visa business - The cost of visas for Kosovars

Kosovo has a huge problem with visa regimes. Kosovars are limited in traveling only on a few countries without visas, mainly neighboring countries, which are not yet part of EU.

The infographics shows the number of applicants for a Schengen visa in the past three years. The numbers, taken from Eurostat, include the type of visa and the refusal rate. The data were exclusive to the wider public, as such information were deliberately never published by individual embassies or the Government of Kosovo.

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Political clientelism - still wasting your money

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Political clientelism - still wasting your money

This movie describes to the general viewer how the complex policy of money allocations to local governments is manipulated in order to reinforce political clientelism in Romania. Opacity and confusion are deliberately maintained in the process to hide its results from the wider public. Therefore, EFOR’s goal was to explain to citizens the importance and magnitude of phenomena, increase awareness and boost the bottom up pressure for change. In the four months since it was published, the movie clip (in two versions, Romanian and English) has been accessed online 5500 times and shown in three major conferences related to decentralization and good governance. It will gather much more in December, when we will use it as a vector in the debates about regionalization and territorial reform, which are topical subjects in Romania.

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CIEP Tax Simulator

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CIEP Tax Simulator

“Simulador Fiscal CIEP” (CIEP Tax simulator) is a technological tool available on the Centre for Economic and Budgetary Research´s (CIEP) website, in which tax policies and proposals can be evaluated in a clear and simple way. It allows calculating how much the main taxes can be raised in Mexico, on whom would changes fall, who will pay more and who will pay less. Likewise, how and how much will the different segments of population pay, by categories of age and income.

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Our Money - Visualisation of the Hungarian Budget Spending

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Our Money - Visualisation of the Hungarian Budget Spending

Our aim was to present the budget spending of the Hungarian State in a simple and catchy way so as to make it comprehensible to interested layperson.

We visualized budget data broken down into specific expenditure categories to provide information what exactly is our tax money spent on. With the graphical and interactive presentation of the budgetary expenses we would like to inform mostly young people generally interested in these questions. Furthermore, with this initiative we hope to contribute to the strengthening of national tax consciousness and of civic responsibility in general, which is of burning importance in the Central-Eastern European region.

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CIPPEC data

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CIPPEC data

CIPPEC data is a dynamic visualization based on an interactive cartogram that shows how Argentina’s map would be if it reflected a number of social, political and economic variables. The cartogram reflects the value of these indicators for different provinces and their relative weight in a topic of interest. The map is deformed and shows, for example, the weight of the province of Buenos Aires, which accounts for 40% of Argentina's population. A new transformation, however, shows the same province shrinking when it reflects one of the lowest incomes from the tax revenue sharing system.

The aim of the initiative is to show the differences between the provinces in a series of indicators, to explain structural problems Argentina faces in terms of inequality.

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Mapping Arms Data (MAD)

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Mapping Arms Data (MAD)

The MAD visualization was prepared by the Igarapé Institute, PRIO and Google Ideas in 2012 (and re-launched in 2013). It documents millions of military and civilian small arms transfers (exports and imports) around the world since the early 1990s. The width of the line connecting states represents the scale (in dollar value) of the transfer. Its color determines whether it is an import or an export. It is highly intuitive. MAD was originally developed as an experiment for a major Google summit on illicit networks. It was updated with new data in 2013 and launched with the intention of impacting United Nations negotiations on a new arms trade treaty (ATT) as well as stimulating a more sophisticated global debate on the dynamics of international arms and ammunition transfers. The goal was to take a complex topic and render it more accessible for public debate and scrutiny.

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