Ecos de México

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Ecos de México

Creators:

José Luis Chicoma, Maricarmen Medina-Mora

Organisation and country:

Ethos Public Policy Lab, Mexico

Description:

Through a monthly infographic, using stars to rate the image of Mexico just like a book or movie review, Ecos de México takes look at the international media’s perception of the country.

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UK Government departments by grade composition, 2010 and 2014

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UK Government departments by grade composition, 2010 and 2014

Creators:

Gavin Freeguard, Petr Bouchal, Robyn Munro, Caragh Nimmo, Emily Andrews, Julian McCrae, Andrew Murphy, IfG communications team

Organisation and country:

Institute for Government, UK

Description:

This visualisation shows the composition of different UK government departments by grade – from most senior (SCS, or Senior Civil Service) to most junior (AA and AO, Administrative Officers and Administrative Assistants). It shows some departments – DECC, DfID, Health, DCMS, HMT, Cabinet Office – have a high percentage of staff in senior grades, while others have staff concentrated in the more junior, administrative grades.

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Think-Act-Impact video animation

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Think-Act-Impact video animation

Video in Serbian only. English transcript available for download.

CREATORS:

Stefan Sipka, Nebojsa Lazarevic

ORGANISATION AND COUNTRY:

European Policy Center in Belgrade (Centar za evrposke politike - CEP), Serbia

DESCRIPTION:

This animation was developed for the project 'Think-Act-Impact: Ensuring Improved Implementation of EU Directives on Environmental Impact Assessment in Serbia', which comprises research as well as practical activities focused on environmental impact assessment (EIA) and particularly the functioning of institutions and public participation.

This animation primarily has wider public as its target group. The purpose of developing this animation was to explain in generally comprehensible language and through visualisations what the EIA is, and most importantly why is it important for citizens to take part in this procedure.

It consists of 10 slides and starts from concrete associations of a particular development project (factory, road, mine) and progressively leads the views towards more abstract and institutional issues concerning EIA including the role of the public in the procedure.

So far it has been published on online on official sites of the organisations implementing the project (CEP as a leading organisation and Ecological Center "Habitat" and Serbia on the Move as partner organisations), on YouTube and by presenting the animation on public events e.g. workshops.

As the animation was was published at the end of September, it is still too early to draw conclusions of its overall impact. At this point it has 163 views on Youtube. However the real number is higher than 200 because it was also shown offline during workshops (organised as additional project activities), as well as to other interested persons.

The project "Think-Act-Impact" is financially supported by the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Belgrade.

Communication strategy:

In addition to the animation, one 26-minute TV show was also published (accessible on CEP website), and a second TV show is under preparation. The goal of these video materials (animation and TV shows) is to depict the most important aspects of the EIA concerning institutions and public participation. That is achieved while presenting results of the project "Think-Act-Impact" due to fact that it included research whose results were useful to apply in the TV show and animation and to contribute to increased public participation in the EIA procedure.

Impact:

Due to the fact that both TV show and animation were published only recently and that entire project is still ongoing, it is still early to draw conclusions of the communication impact of the published materials. Besides video materials, other communication activities consisted of publishing online reports and communicating the results of the project activities on public events. 

 

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Adult obesity in the United States

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Adult obesity in the United States

Creators:

Jeff Stanger, CDI Lab, Pim Linders/Data Focus, Burness Communications

Organisation and country:

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Trust for America's Health, USA

Description:

Adult Obesity in the United States tracks the rise in obesity rates since 1990 using data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The interactive visualisation is the centerpiece of the annual State of Obesity report co-produced by the Washington, DC-based Trust for America's Health and the Princeton NJ-based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report, and accompanying interactive, are the authoritative annual statement on obesity rates in the United States. The visualisation presents adult obesity rates from each U.S. state and the District of Columbia over 25 years, clearly illuminating the rapid rise of obesity over time using a line graph, dynamic table, and map that is zoomable by isolate particular geographic regions. The audiences for the piece are journalists, policymakers and the engaged public. The visualisation has been accessed nearly 50,000 times since its launch in early September and has been a primary driver of extensive media coverage about the obesity issue as well as social media conversation at #stateofobesity.

Communication strategy:

As indicated in the main description, this visualisation is part of a much broader research agenda and communication campaign around the obesity issue in the United States. The campaign involves paid media, promoted social media posts, social media outreach, mainstream media cultivation and coverage, webinars and U.S. Capitol release events.

The main adult obesity interactive visualization is part of a much deeper obesity "microsite" titled State of Obesity. The microsite contains additional interactive visualizations and data-driven pages on a range of related topics, state-by-state profiles, policy analysis and recommendations, and more.

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Identity Crisis: The Israeli ID System

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Identity Crisis: The Israeli ID System

CREATORS:

Joumana Al Jabri, Ahmad Barclay, Conor McNally, Ramzi Jaber

ORGANISATION AND COUNTRY:

Visualizing Impact, Lebanon

DESCRIPTION:

The mainstream media portrays Israel and Palestine as two distinct entities in conflict, governed by two separate authorities. In reality, the Israeli Ministry of the Interior controls the entire population of Israel, Jerusalem, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip through its determination of ID status. The five different ID statuses enforce a hierarchy of rights within this territory, while excluding refugees entirely. Visualizing Palestine developed its ‘Identity Crisis’ visual to raise awareness in the run up to the Knesset’s 2014 vote on the Entry Law.

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Challenges of Health Care System in Uzbekistan: How to Address Growing Expenditures and Demand?

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Challenges of Health Care System in Uzbekistan: How to Address Growing Expenditures and Demand?

Creators:

Ekaterina Ustinenko, Zafar Berdinazarov, Umidjon Abdullajonov

Organisation and country:

Center for Economic Research (CER), Uzbekistan

Description:

This infographic was developed for joint research of CER and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) - "Uzbekistan Towards 2030: A New Social Protection Model for a Changing Economy and Society."

The data show how health care system expenditures and demand in Uzbekistan will change through 2030, especially with the ageing population.

The target audiences are government ministries and agencies, and local and international institutes, including UN agencies in Uzbekistan. The infographic was widely used for Development Dialogues held by CER, for different roundtables and meetings with local and international experts. The impact was a number of discussions in health care sector among government ministries and agencies.

Communication strategy:

Both research on "Uzbekistan Towards 2030: A New Social Protection Model for a Changing Economy and Society" and infographic "Challenges of Health Care System in Uzbekistan: How to Address Growing Expenditures and Demand?" were widely distributed to recipients of CER dessimination list, which includes representatives of UN agencies (worldwide), World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and different international and regional think tanks, research institutes and other independent experts.

Also, these two documents were sent to mass media and participants of Development Dialogue, who included representatives of international organisations and diplomatic missions in Uzbekistan.

The objective of dessimination was to inform the audience with the latest actual research, which would have a great impact on development and social transformation of Uzbekistan. Also, both documents were sent as application for participation in different international workshops, including Second ADB-Asian Think Tank Development Forum 2014.

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Legalizing Restrictions of the Freedom of the Press

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Legalizing Restrictions of the Freedom of the Press

Creators:

Risto Aleksovski, Ana Blazeva

Organisation and country:

Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities, Macedonia

Description:

Advocacy-centered visualisation is part of the wider communication strategy of the Institute of social sciences and humanities – Skopje (ISSHS). This visualisation aims to raise awareness related to the problem of the unrelenting deterioration of the freedom of expression in the Republic of Macedonia.

The visualisation we are presenting is one of a publicly advocated recommendation contained in the policy report "Legalizing Restrictions of the Freedom of the Press," produced by a team of ISSHS researchers. It consists of an image which is in fact a snapshot of the campaign carried out on Twitter under the profile named "Ministry of Truth" (inspired by George Orwell's 1984).

The target audience consists of local and international civil society organisations, activists, national and EU institutions; the relevant institutional stakeholders as well as the local representatives of the international organisations are addressed with direct tweets.

In short, we have submitted a visualised message rather than visualised data extracted from an actual advocacy campaign carried out on Twitter and other social media.

Communication strategy:

This visualisation is part of the wider communication strategy of the Institute of social sciences and humanities – Skopje (ISSHS) aiming to raise awareness related to the problem of ceaseless deterioration of the freedom of expression in the Republic of Macedonia.

It is accompanying the policy report "Legalizing Restrictions of the Freedom of the Press," produced by a team of ISSHS researchers. The recommendations are visualized as separate tweets shared on Twitter and other social networks.

By using the recognizable Twitter visual language and symbolic of Orwell’s 1984 we try to encourage discussion and question the contemporary policy mechanisms implemented by the government.

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The reality of illegal mining in Amazon countries

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The reality of illegal mining in Amazon countries

Creators:

Jimmy Carrillo Saavedra, Carmen Heck

Organisation and country:

Sociedad Peruana de Derecho Ambiental (SPDA - Peruvian Society for Environmental Development), Peru

Description:

This infographic summarises some of the most important results from six research projects around the expansion of illegal mining. Those studies were made in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. The studies demonstrate the serious threat that these activities pose to the health of the Amazonian population and to areas specifically dedicated to the conservation of biodiversity. 

The elements analysed across the six countries are: the expansion of illegal mining activities in protected natural areas, the uncontrolled use of harmful chemicals (mercury and cyanide) with serious implications for the health of the population, and increasing instances of child labour, forced labour, trafficking and exploitation.

Also, the infographic visualises the economic activity generated by this movement, expressed in the percentage of illegal gold production as part of the national production of each country.

The studies were conducted in the framework of the alliance between SPDA, Avina and Skoll, add to the effort of understanding of potential methods for addressing such a complex reality in the following years.

Communication strategy:

This infographic is part of a larger research that analyses the state of illegal mining in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. The infographic was part of an outreach strategy, which also included the presentation of a book with the investigations. Also included a media and a social networks strategy to spread and generate debate on this topic.

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Supporting Durable Solutions to Urban, Post-Disaster Displacement

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Supporting Durable Solutions to Urban, Post-Disaster Displacement

brookings-UrbanDisplacement_IDP_Final.png

Creators:

Marcia Underwood, Jessica Pavone, Kevin Hawkins

Organisation and country:

The Brookings Institution, United States of America

Description:

The study, Supporting Durable Solutions to Urban, Post-Disaster Displacement: Challenges and Opportunities in Haiti, examines the question of durable solutions to displacement in Haiti four years after the devastating earthquake. This graphic highlights the key findings from the study, which draws on the results of focus groups in camps and communities, site visits, in-depth interviews and a survey of 2,576 households (outside camps) in Port-au-Prince.

The graphic was developed as a companion to the report: Supporting Durable Solutions to Urban, Post-Disaster Displacement: Challenges and Opportunities in Haiti.

The objective of the graphic was to succinctly visually summarise the report findings regarding the difficult situation many individuals are still facing, even several years since the earthquake struck, in order to encourage policies that address these challenges. The target audience is broadly the foreign policy, humanitarian affairs, and global development community generally, and individuals involved in global IDP (internally displaced persons) work specifically. The graphic has been used on our web site, and printed graphics were used at a related event.

Communication strategy:

This visualisation was part of a broader integrated communications strategy to:

  • examine the question of durable solutions to displacement in Port-au-Prince;
  • recognise the challenges faced in Haiti; and
  • provide the key findings of the report to domestic and international policymakers, media and those intimately involved with humanitarian efforts in Haiti and beyond.

The visualization was promoted/communicated via several different channels and platforms:

  • report landing page with data visualisation highlighted prominently
  • separate interactive landing page
  • event
  • blog post
  • media and policymaker outreach
  • digital outreach, including email and social media (Twitter, Facebook). This including using the #DurableSolutions for the report, blog post, and event in order to engage our target audience in conversation.

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Flooding in Piura River Basin

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Flooding in Piura River Basin

Practical-action-INUNDACIONES PIURA.png

Creators:

Francis Salas, Giannina Solari, Doris Mejia

Organisation and country:

Soluciones Prácticas- Practical Action, Peru

Description:

This visualisation is targeted at practicioners and leaders, authorities and the general public (through the media) . It explains the problem of flooding in Piura but also puts such events into historical context. It's designed to be a quick way to get an overview of a lot of information too support decision-making about floods in the region.

Communication strategy:

Create and deliver the most comprehensive information system on floods for Latin America.

  • Activity 1: Produce State of Arts about information on floods in Peru and Latin America.
  • Activity 2: Build the biggest repository of information on flooding in Latin America.
  • Activity 3: Production of knowledge objects. For existing technologies to reduce risk of floods in Latin America and best practice.
  • Activity 4: Promotion and distribution of information. Promote the website through different communication channels such as listservs, social networks, newsletters, radio programs and newspapers at local, national and international level (priorized latin countries).

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Don't limit HER possibilities!

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Don't limit HER possibilities!

Creators:

Eric Barrett, Nino Macharashvili, Ia Ninoshvili, Mariam Kobuladze, Jason Addie, Irakli Chumburidze

Organisation and country:

JumpStart Georgia

Description:

While girls score equally as well as boys on Georgian exit exams in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects, they receive less support, are consistently less confident, and ultimately make up only 16% university students in IT. At the same time, STEM employers are finding it difficult to recruit enough skilled employees.

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Lowy Institute 2014 Polling Interactive

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Lowy Institute 2014 Polling Interactive

Creators:

Stephanie Dunstan, Alex Oliver, Nirupam Gupta with Lekki Maze (Glider Creative)

Organisation and country:

Lowy Institute for International Policy, Australia

Description:

As the leading tracking survey on Australian international policy, the annual Lowy Institute Poll provides an independent, rigorous, reliable basis for understanding Australian attitudes to the world. 2014 marks the tenth year of the Lowy Institute Poll. Over the past ten years, the Poll has identified significant shifts in public sentiment, and has provoked vigorous debate on issues such as Australia's relationship with the United States, investment from China and climate change.

The Polling interactive was a special initiative of the Lowy Institute designed to bring to life a selection of the Poll’s most striking and significant results over the last nine years. It allowed users to interact with the polling data, through graphs that could be manipulated to compare and contrast specific data points. Results can be exported to PDF for printing.  It also included brief analysis on overall trends in polling data.

The interactive was designed for use by the Lowy Institute's key audience groups - policy makers, the media, academics/students, corporates and the wider public. A pop-up survey tracked usage. 

The interactive has been a huge success. It has proven more popular than the 2014 Poll report, with over 17,500 unique views, compared to 6,400 for the report.  It is the fifth most popular page on the Lowy Institute website, bringing in over 5% of all traffic to our website.

Communication strategy:

The interactive was a significant step in improving the Institute’s ability to communicate data rich research content in a meaningful way for our stakeholders. It was timed for launch with the Poll report, and promoted as a key 'value added' product for users.

This included a press release, launch event, promotion via Twitter(#LowyPoll2014) including use of Google Adwords, Facebook Advertising and Linked In Sponsored Updates. Throughout the year, as different Poll results are discussed in the media, the Institute has continued to promote the Interactive via social media accounts.

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Pull Power: Attractions and detractions in the time zone of the twenty-first century

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Pull Power: Attractions and detractions in the time zone of the twenty-first century

Perth USAsia - Pull Power.png

Creators:

Madeleine King, Gordon Flake, Elena Douglas, Milly Main, Tom Harper, Caitlin Perry

Organisation and country:

Perth USAsia Centre, Australia

Description:

Knowledge Society developed this infographic for the Perth USAsia Centre with designers TOMD and Setsquare Studio. It charts the desirability of eighteen Indo-Pacific countries located in the four-hour time window we call ‘The Zone’. Sixty per cent of the world’s population and the nations that promise the greatest economic growth in the twenty-first century inhabit this region.

The diagram maps positive and negative factors – attractions and detractions. The positive side of the ring comprises three concrete measures of attractiveness – international students, international tourists and permanent migrants – and creativity used as a proxy for a fourth, liveability. The negative side of the ring comprises four measures universally recognised as undesirable – homicide as a measure of violence; slavery; corruption and capital punishment.

Each country in the Zone is ranked according to these eight measures. The result is a map of the desirability of nations; dots for each country connect to form a shape. On the right, each country’s mini-map replicates this shape. Peruse these mini-maps for a collective impression of each country’s pulling power. A left-weighted shape means a country is less desirable, and vice versa.

This graphic was distributed at the 2014 In the Zone conference at the University of Western Australia, a forum for business, policymakers and researchers. It features in a master report, Smart Power: A new narrative of prosperity, persuasion and projection in the Zone, which analyses eighteen countries using Joseph Nye’s framework of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ power.

Communication strategy:

This graphic was distributed at the 2014 In the Zone conference at the University of Western Australia, a forum for business, policymakers and researchers, and disseminated online by the Perth USAsia Centre and the University.

It features in a master report, Smart Power: A new narrative of prosperity, persuasion and projection in the Zone, which analyses eighteen countries in the Indo-Pacific region (the four-hour time window we call ‘The Zone’) using Joseph Nye’s Smart Power framework.

Smart Power recognises that economic power – gross domestic product, trade and foreign investment – is not the only measure of power that mature nations should address. Nor is military power. Both must be considered. Cultural power – education in all its dimensions and the cross-cultural empathy nurtured by artists, designers, performers and sportspeople – is also crucial to national strength.

In thirteen data stories, Smart Power contrasts the size and clout of these countries’ economies and militaries and examines various cultural measures (including education, language and film production).

This data story, Pull Power, illustrates the capacity of a country to attract tourists, students and migrants – people who have ‘voted with their feet’. Countries with higher levels of hard and soft power tend to receive more of these ‘votes’, and hence have higher pulling power. Pull Power – as part of the Smart Power report – is intended to aid governments and businesses to better understand the new contours of power and prosperity that define the modern world and to make better-informed, and ultimately wiser, decisions.

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Indian states performance in protecting people below poverty line from catastrophic healthcare expenditure

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Indian states performance in protecting people below poverty line from catastrophic healthcare expenditure

Creator:

Prashanth N S, Tanya Seshadri

Organisation and country:

Institute of Public Health Bangalore, India

Description:

This data visualisation shows the extent of coverage of people below poverty line in one of India's landmark social protection scheme called "Rashtriya Swsthya Bima Yojana" (in English, National Health Insurance Scheme). The visualisation shows how the various Indian states improved the coverage of their poorest population under the scheme.

The scheme targets national level policymakers and hopes to convince them on the need for better local adaptation and contextualisation of the scheme to suit particular needs of people in a very diverse country like India. Local differences in governance and several cultural factors at district level (there are 600-odd districts in India!) determine some of these differences.

This data visualisation is also special because there is very little "public data culture" in most government departments in India and hence the data used in this visualisation had to be based on data obtained under India's freedom of information legislation called Right to Information Act. Over time, along with several other inputs from later research publications the RSBY scheme is in the process of being improved for better state and district level adaptation/contextualisation.

Communication strategy:

This data visualisation was a part of a broad personal objective of information/data activism, wherein I have been using publicly obtained information (through the exercise of the freedom of information legislation) and disseminating them for driving "action".

In addition, this was also shared with several state-level and national-level policymakers. It was also disseminated through several research reports about this scheme. Along with similar other campaigns for better public dissemination of information and greater public discourse, this visualisation helped improve the discussion on improving public availability of data in India. See for example, this editorial I wrote in a national newspaper, titled Counting system losing Count.

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The great resource price shock

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The great resource price shock

Creators:

Julian Morgan, Dustin Benton, Matthew Spencer, Karen Crane

Organisation and country:

Green Alliance, United Kingdom

Description:

The project supported by the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, to create public debate around the opportunity for green growth, and the economic risk of unsustainable use of resources.The infographic was one output resulting from a major analysis of the economic impact of resource price shocks; it charted the rise in global resource prices over the past decade, the impact on UK consumer prices, the monetary policy of the Bank of England, real wages and the cost of living - a phenomenon we named 'The Great Resource Price Shock'.

The infographic was designed to provide quick visual access to the main messages. It received substantial coverage, including a full page piece in the economics section of The Guardian print edition (‘UK price rise exposes failure to prepare for food and fuel shocks’, 3 March 2014). It was commented on by the target audience of economists, decision makers and policy experts in government, business, environmental and academic communities, with the images retweeted widely on Twitter.

Communication strategy:

The communications strategy was to create a new frame of economic thinking, connecting cost of living rise to fluctuations in resource prices. The infographic was one output resulting from an economic analysis of what we called 'The Great Resource Price Shock'.

The infographic gave quick visual access to the main messages behind this and it was released along with an evidence based policy insight. The analysis (described above) discussed possible policy responses and argued that the evidence strongly pointed to the need for careful resource stewardship.

Impact and uptake:

It received substantial coverage, including a full page piece in the economics section of The Guardian (described above) and the infographics were retweeted widely on Twitter.

A short Prezi video, featuring the infographic, also describes the reasons for the phenomenon. This was recommended to others by economist Professor Mariana Mazzucato.

Our piece on the Huffington Post, asking why economists don’t pay more attention to rising resource prices, was also picked up on social media, which led to an exchange with Yvo de Boer (former executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) on the extent to which economists and corporations pay attention to resources.

The data visualisation created a clear focus and distillation for the messages and helped to effectively illustrate and give the sense that an economic shock had taken place. It has since been central to further discussions with the political parties, with a strong narrative around resource security particularly being developed by the Conservative party.

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Adult Obesity in the United States

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Adult Obesity in the United States

Creators:

Jeff Stanger, CDI Lab, Pim Linders/Data Focus, Burness Communications

Organisation and country:

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Trust for America's Health, USA

Description:

Adult Obesity in the United States tracks the rise in obesity rates since 1990 using data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The interactive visualisation is the centerpiece of the annual State of Obesity report co-produced by the Washington, DC-based Trust for America's Health and the Princeton NJ-based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report, and accompanying interactive, are the authoritative annual statement on obesity rates in the United States. The visualisation presents adult obesity rates from each U.S. state and the District of Columbia over 25 years, clearly illuminating the rapid rise of obesity over time using a line graph, dynamic table, and map that is zoomable by isolate particular geographic regions. The audiences for the piece are journalists, policymakers and the engaged public. The visualisation has been accessed nearly 50,000 times since its launch in early September and has been a primary driver of extensive media coverage about the obesity issue as well as social media conversation at #stateofobesity.

Final vote count:

6

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Lowy Institute 2014 Polling Interactive

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Lowy Institute 2014 Polling Interactive

Creators:

Stephanie Dunstan, Alex Oliver, Nirupam Gupta

Organisation and country:

Lowy Institute for International Policy, Australia

Description:

As the leading tracking survey on Australian international policy, the annual Lowy Institute Poll provides an independent, rigorous, reliable basis for understanding Australian attitudes to the world. 2014 marks the tenth year of the Lowy Institute Poll. Over the past ten years, the Poll has identified significant shifts in public sentiment, and has provoked vigorous debate on issues such as Australia's relationship with the United States, investment from China and climate change.

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Reading national signatures in urbanisation-income space

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Reading national signatures in urbanisation-income space

CREATORS:

Gordon McGranahan, Anna Walnycki, Duncan Clark, Robin Houston

ORGANISATION AND COUNTRY:

International Institute of Environment and Development, UK

DESCRIPTION:

The visualisation, created in partnership with interactive data specialists Kiln, explores the complex and crucial relationship between income per capita and urbanisation. It combines a video-style "Talkie" introduction that tells the key stories with full interactive controls that allow the user to explore the data at their own pace. It was developed to bring a rich time-series dataset to life and to provide policy experts and interested members of the public alike with a more nuanced understanding of how the urbanisation–GNI relationship differs around the world – and in particular in the BRICS nations and their respective regions. The visualisation has been widely used in talks as well as being featured online, where it has generated a lot of interest.

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