Perth USAsia - Pull Power.png

Creators:

Madeleine King, Gordon Flake, Elena Douglas, Milly Main, Tom Harper, Caitlin Perry

Organisation and country:

Perth USAsia Centre, Australia

Description:

Knowledge Society developed this infographic for the Perth USAsia Centre with designers TOMD and Setsquare Studio. It charts the desirability of eighteen Indo-Pacific countries located in the four-hour time window we call ‘The Zone’. Sixty per cent of the world’s population and the nations that promise the greatest economic growth in the twenty-first century inhabit this region.

The diagram maps positive and negative factors – attractions and detractions. The positive side of the ring comprises three concrete measures of attractiveness – international students, international tourists and permanent migrants – and creativity used as a proxy for a fourth, liveability. The negative side of the ring comprises four measures universally recognised as undesirable – homicide as a measure of violence; slavery; corruption and capital punishment.

Each country in the Zone is ranked according to these eight measures. The result is a map of the desirability of nations; dots for each country connect to form a shape. On the right, each country’s mini-map replicates this shape. Peruse these mini-maps for a collective impression of each country’s pulling power. A left-weighted shape means a country is less desirable, and vice versa.

This graphic was distributed at the 2014 In the Zone conference at the University of Western Australia, a forum for business, policymakers and researchers. It features in a master report, Smart Power: A new narrative of prosperity, persuasion and projection in the Zone, which analyses eighteen countries using Joseph Nye’s framework of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ power.

Communication strategy:

This graphic was distributed at the 2014 In the Zone conference at the University of Western Australia, a forum for business, policymakers and researchers, and disseminated online by the Perth USAsia Centre and the University.

It features in a master report, Smart Power: A new narrative of prosperity, persuasion and projection in the Zone, which analyses eighteen countries in the Indo-Pacific region (the four-hour time window we call ‘The Zone’) using Joseph Nye’s Smart Power framework.

Smart Power recognises that economic power – gross domestic product, trade and foreign investment – is not the only measure of power that mature nations should address. Nor is military power. Both must be considered. Cultural power – education in all its dimensions and the cross-cultural empathy nurtured by artists, designers, performers and sportspeople – is also crucial to national strength.

In thirteen data stories, Smart Power contrasts the size and clout of these countries’ economies and militaries and examines various cultural measures (including education, language and film production).

This data story, Pull Power, illustrates the capacity of a country to attract tourists, students and migrants – people who have ‘voted with their feet’. Countries with higher levels of hard and soft power tend to receive more of these ‘votes’, and hence have higher pulling power. Pull Power – as part of the Smart Power report – is intended to aid governments and businesses to better understand the new contours of power and prosperity that define the modern world and to make better-informed, and ultimately wiser, decisions.

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